While there is no guaranteed way to prevent Alzheimer's, there are many things you can do to  reduce your Alzheimer's risk.

 

Dementia Prevention

 

More research is needed to confirm specific Alzheimer's prevention strategies. But, here are some steps that have been associated with reduced likelihood of developing dementia.

1. Avoid smoking.

2. Control vascular risk factors, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

3. Eat a balanced diet — such as the Mediterranean diet — that's rich in vegetables, fruits and lean protein, particularly protein sources containing omega-3 fatty acids.

4. Be physically and socially active, including engaging in aerobic exercise.

5. Take care of your mental health.

6. Use thinking (cognitive) skills, such as memory skills. Regular stimulating mental activity is important for brain health.

 


 

 

2. Control Medical Conditions (Diabetes, High Blood Pressure)

Heart and brain health are closely linked. Studies have shown that individuals with high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, or a history of strokes are at a 30 to 50 percent higher risk of developing Alzheimer's.

If you have been diagnosed with one of the conditions above it is important to monitor and treat them.

 

Heart and brain health are closely linked. Studies have shown that individuals with high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, or a history of strokes are at a 30 to 50 percent higher risk of developing Alzheimer's.

 

If you have been diagnosed with one of the conditions above it is important to monitor and treat them.

 

 

 

3. MIND DIET (or try Mediterranean or Dash Diets)

Ingredients_Healthy_Food.jpg

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Focus on foods with the strongest findings of dementia prevention.
 
  • Green, leafy vegetables: Aim for six or more servings per week. This includes kale, spinach, cooked greens and salads.
  • All other vegetables: Try to eat another vegetable in addition to the green leafy vegetables at least once a day. It is best to choose non-starchy vegetables because they have a lot of nutrients with a low number of calories.
  • Berries: Eat berries at least twice a week. Although the published research only includes strawberries, you should also consume other berries like blueberries, raspberries and blackberries for their antioxidant benefits.
  • Nuts: Try to get five servings of nuts or more each week. The creators of the MIND diet don’t specify what kind of nuts to consume, but it is probably best to vary the type of nuts you eat to obtain a variety of nutrients.
  • Olive oil: Use olive oil as your main cooking oil.
  • Whole grains: Aim for at least three servings daily. Choose whole grains like oatmeal, quinoa, brown rice, whole-wheat pasta and 100% whole-wheat bread.
  • Fish: Eat fish at least once a week. It is best to choose fatty fish like salmon, sardines, trout, tuna and mackerel for their high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Beans: Include beans in at least four meals every week. This includes all beans, lentils and soybeans.
  • Poultry: Try to eat chicken or turkey at least twice a week. Note that fried chicken is not encouraged on the MIND diet.
  • Wine: Aim for no more than one glass daily. Both red and white wine may benefit the brain. However, much research has focused on the red wine compound resveratrol.
  •  

    AVOID or limit the following foods:

    • Butter and margarine: Try to eat less than 1 tablespoon (about 14 grams) daily. Instead, try using olive oil as your primary cooking fat, and dipping your bread in olive oil with herbs.
    • Cheese: The MIND diet recommends limiting your cheese consumption to less than once per week.
    • Red meat: Aim for no more than three servings each week. This includes all beef, pork, lamb and products made from these meats.
    • Fried food: The MIND diet highly discourages fried food, especially the kind from fast-food restaurants. Limit your consumption to less than once per week.
    • Pastries and sweets: This includes most of the processed junk food and desserts you can think of. Ice cream, cookies, brownies, snack cakes, donuts, candy and more. Try to limit these to no more than four times a week.

     
    HispFamJog.jpg

    4. Exercise - Regular physical exercise has been shown to keep the brain young and reduce Alzheimer's risk.

     Jonathan Graff-Radford, M.D.

     Studies show that people who are physically active are less likely to experience a decline in their mental function, have a lowered risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, and possibly have improved thinking among people with vascular cognitive impairment.

    Exercising several times a week for 30 to 60 minutes may:

    • Keep thinking, reasoning and learning skills sharp for healthy individuals
    • Improve memory, reasoning, judgment and thinking skills (cognitive function) for people with mild Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment
    • Delay the start of Alzheimer's for people at risk of developing the disease or slow the progress of the disease

    Physical activity seems to help your brain not only by keeping the blood flowing but also by increasing chemicals that protect the brain. Physical activity also tends to counter some of the natural reduction in brain connections that occurs with aging.

    More research is needed to know to what degree adding physical activity improves memory or slows the progression of cognitive decline. Nonetheless, regular exercise is important to stay physically and mentally fit. 

    Info from Mayo Clinic on Exercise- Click Here


     

    Chronic Nutrient Deficiencies May Damage the Brain.

    The brain needs certain vitamins and nutrients to repair itself, clean out waste products, and create new brain cells. When the brain does not receive these nutrients, especially for long periods of time, brain damage can occur.

    Studies have linked several nutrient deficiencies significantly increased risk of of Alzheimer's and dementia.

    An international research team found that adults whom were moderately deficient in Vitamin D had a 53% increased chance of developing dementia, while those severely deficient had an increased risk of 125% of developing dementia.

     

    Preventive behaviors: Diet-

     

    At least three servings of whole grains a day

    Geen leafy vegetables (such as salad) at least six times a week

    Other vegetables at least once a day

    Berries at least twice a week

    Red meat less than four times a week

    Fish at least once a week

    Poultry at least twice a week

    Beans more than three times a week

    Nuts at least five times a week

    Fried or fast food less than once a week

    Mainly olive oil for cooking

    Less than a tablespoon of butter or margarine a day

    Less than a serving of cheese a week

    Less than five pastries or sweets a week

    One glass of wine or other alcoholic drink a day


    Enter supporting content here